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Author: Amanda B. Keener

A repurposed TB vaccine shows early promise against diseases like diabetes and MS

The effects of the BCG shot on infections and autoimmune diseases is beginning to make sense Around the world, volunteers are getting a vaccine developed to prevent tuberculosis in studies that have nothing to do with TB. Called Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, or BCG, the shot is being tested as a treatment for type 1 diabetes, Alzheimer’s

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Even hard-to-kill tardigrades can’t always survive being shot out of a gun

That implies hardy water bears may not withstand crash-landing on a new planet Tardigrades aren’t completely bulletproof, after all. These microscopic critters, also known as water bears, are practically unkillable (SN: 7/14/17). They can go years without food or water, withstand freezing and scalding temperatures and endure blistering radiation and the vacuum of outer space.

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Vaccinating people in developing countries costs far less than doing nothing

Shots for half those adults will cost $9.3 billion, the Rockefeller Foundation reports As the United States and other nations celebrate what looks like the beginning of the end of the COVID-19 pandemic — with a quarter to half their populations vaccinated — many less well-off countries are lagging far behind. Some have vaccinated less

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Some fast radio bursts come from the spiral arms of other galaxies

Locating the bursts’ homes suggests a connection to ordinary, young stars Five brief, bright blasts of radio waves from deep space now have precise addresses. The fast radio bursts, or FRBs, come from the spiral arms of their host galaxies, researchers report in a study to appear in the Astrophysical Journal. The proximity of the

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Here’s what we know about the risks of serious side effects from COVID-19 vaccines

Risks of rare allergic reactions, blood clots and maybe heart problems don’t outweigh benefits Many people have experienced sore arms and feeling wiped out for a couple of days after getting a COVID-19 vaccine. Some get fevers, chills and headaches. Those familiar side effects have become widely accepted as the price of protection against the

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The teeth of ‘wandering meatloaf’ contain a rare mineral found only in rocks

The giant Pacific chiton’s use of santabarbaraite could inspire materials for soft robotics The hard, magnetic teeth of a leathery red-brown mollusk nicknamed “the wandering meatloaf” possess a rare mineral previously seen only in rocks. The mineral may help the mollusk — the giant Pacific chiton (Cryptochiton stelleri) — meld its soft flesh to the

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A sweet father-son bond inspires tasty new molecule models

Bite-sized gummy candy proteins could even the playing field for STEM students who are blind Thirteen-year-old Noah Shaw loves planets and has perfect pitch. He wants to be a scientist like his father Bryan Shaw, a biochemist at Baylor University in Waco, Texas. But Noah’s path to science may not be as smooth as it

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Laser experiments suggest helium rain falls on Jupiter

Hydrogen and helium separate at pressures and temperatures found within the gas giant Sprinkles of helium rain may fall on Jupiter. At pressures and temperatures present within the gas giant, the hydrogen and helium that make up the bulk of its atmosphere don’t mix, according to laboratory experiments reported in the May 27 Nature. That

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Hunter-gatherers first launched violent raids at least 13,400 years ago

Small-scale warfare began in the Stone Age, a new study suggests More than 8,000 years before the rise of Egyptian civilization, hunter-gatherers went on the attack in the Nile Valley. Skeletons of adults, teens and children excavated in the 1960s at an ancient cemetery in Sudan known as Jebel Sahaba display injuries incurred in repeated

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To find answers about the 1921 race massacre, Tulsa digs up its painful past

On May 30, 1921, Dick Rowland, a 19-year-old Black shoe shiner, walked into an elevator in downtown Tulsa, Okla. What happened next is unclear, but it sparked the Tulsa race massacre, one of the worst episodes of racial violence in U.S. history, with a death toll estimated in the hundreds. A century later, researchers are

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